Exam Code: icnd2 200 105 (Practice Exam Latest Test Questions VCE PDF)
Exam Name: Interconnecting Cisco Networking Devices Part 2 (ICND2 v3.0)
Certification Provider: Cisco
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Q41. - (Topic 2) 

Which type of EIGRP route entry describes a feasible successor? 

A. a backup route, stored in the routing table 

B. a primary route, stored in the routing table 

C. a backup route, stored in the topology table 

D. a primary route, stored in the topology table 

Answer:

Explanation: 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093f07.shtml 

Feasible Successors A destination entry is moved from the topology table to the routing table when there is a feasible successor. All minimum cost paths to the destination form a set. From this set, the neighbors that have an advertised metric less than the current routing table metric are considered feasible successors. Feasible successors are viewed by a router as neighbors that are downstream with respect to the destination. These neighbors and the associated metrics are placed in the forwarding table. When a neighbor changes the metric it has been advertising or a topology change occurs in the network, the set of feasible successors may have to be re-evaluated. However, this is not categorized as a route recomputation. Feasible successor is a route whose Advertised Distance (AD) is less than the Feasible Distance (FD) of the current best path. A feasible successor is a backup route, which is not stored in the routing table but, stored in the topology table. 


Q42. - (Topic 2) 

Refer to the exhibit. 

The network associate is configuring OSPF on the Core router. All the connections to the branches should be participating in OSPF. The link to the ISP should NOT participate in OSPF and should only be advertised as the default route. What set of commands will properly configure the Core router? 

A. Core(config-router)# default-information originate Core(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 area 0 Core(config-router)# exit Core(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.2.14 

B. Core(config-router)# default-information originate Core(config-router)# network 10.10.2.13 0.0.0.242 area 0 Core(config-router)# exit Core(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.2.14 

C. Core(config-router)# default-information originate Core(config-router)# network 10.10.2.16 0.0.0.15 area 0 Core(config-router)# exit Core(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.2.14 

D. Core(config-router)# default-information originate Core(config-router)# network 10.10.2.32 0.0.0.31 area 0 Core(config-router)# exit Core(config)# ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.2.14 

Answer:

Explanation: 

There are two ways to inject a default route into a normal area.1. If the ASBR already has the default route in its routing table, you can advertise theexisting 0.0.0.0/0 into the OSPF domain with the default-information originate router configuration command.2. If the ASBR doesn’t have a default route, you can add the keyword always to the default-information originate command (default-information originate always).This command will advertise a default route into the OSPF domain, regardless of whether it has a route to 0.0.0.0. Another benefit of adding always keyword is that it can add stability to the internetwork. For example, if the ASBR is learning a default route from another routing domain such as RIP and this route is flapping, then without the always keyword, each time the route flaps, the ASBR will send a new Type 5 LSA into the OSPF domain causing some instability inside the OSPF domain. With the always keyword, the ASBR will advertise the default inside the OSPF domain always, In the example shown here, only choice C is correct as the wildcard mask correctly specifies the 10.10.2.16 0.0.0.15 networks, which include all IP addresses in the 10.10.2.16-10.10.2.31 range. In this question we were told that the ISP link should NOT be configured for OSPF, making choice A incorrect. http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_configuration_example09186a00801 ec9f0.shtml 


Q43. - (Topic 2) 

When a router undergoes the exchange protocol within OSPF, in what order does it pass through each state? 

A. exstart state > loading state > exchange state > full state 

B. exstart state > exchange state > loading state > full state 

C. exstart state > full state > loading state > exchange state 

D. loading state > exchange state > full state > exstart state 

Answer:

Explanation: 

OSPF states for adjacency formation are (in order) Down, Init, Attempt, 2-way, Exstart, 

Exchange, Loading and Full. 

Reference: 

Why Are OSPF Neighbors Stuck in Exstart/Exchange State? 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093f0d.shtml 


Q44. - (Topic 2) 

Refer to the exhibit. 

Assume that all of the router interfaces are operational and configured correctly. How will router R2 be affected by the configuration of R1 that is shown in the exhibit? 

A. Router R2 will not form a neighbor relationship with R1. 

B. Router R2 will obtain a full routing table, including a default route, from R1. 

C. R2 will obtain OSPF updates from R1, but will not obtain a default route from R1. 

D. R2 will not have a route for the directly connected serial network, but all other directly connected networks will be present, as well as the two Ethernet networks connected to R1. 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Open Shortest Path First http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Shortest_Path_First 

The configuration of R1 shows "router ospf 1" however, the diagram also shows that both routers should be in the backbone OSPF Area of "0". When routers are in different OSPF areas they will not form a neighbor relationship. Neighbor relationships As a link state routing protocol, OSPF establishes and maintains neighbor relationships in order to exchange routing updates with other routers. The neighbor relationship table is called an adjacency database in OSPF. Provided that OSPF is configured correctly, OSPF forms neighbor relationships only with the routers directly connected to it. In order to form a neighbor relationship between two routers, the interfaces used to form the relationship must be in the same area. Generally an interface is only configured in a single area, however you can configure an interface to belong to multiple areas. In the second area, such an interface must be configured as a secondary interface. (A neighbor state simulation shows how neighbor state changes from Down to Full Adjacency progressively with exchanging Hello, DD, Request, Update, and Ack packets). 


Q45. - (Topic 2) 

What does a router do if it has no EIGRP feasible successor route to a destination network and the successor route to that destination network is in active status? 

A. It routes all traffic that is addressed to the destination network to the interface indicated in the routing table. 

B. It sends a copy of its neighbor table to all adjacent routers. 

C. It sends a multicast query packet to all adjacent neighbors requesting available routing paths to the destination network. 

D. It broadcasts Hello packets to all routers in the network to re-establish neighbor adjacencies. 

Answer:

Explanation: 

Introduction to EIGRP Reference: 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk365/technologies_tech_note09186a0080093f07.shtml 

Feasible Successors 

A destination entry is moved from the topology table to the routing table when there is a feasible successor. All minimum cost paths to the destination form a set. From this set, the neighbors that have an advertised metric less than the current routing table metric are considered feasible successors. 

Feasible successors are viewed by a router as neighbors that are downstream with respect to the destination. 

These neighbors and the associated metrics are placed in the forwarding table. 

When a neighbor changes the metric it has been advertising or a topology change occurs in the network, the set of feasible successors may have to be re-evaluated. However, this is not categorized as a route recomputation. 

Route States 

A topology table entry for a destination can have one of two states. A route is considered in the Passive state when a router is not performing a route recomputation. The route is in Active state when a router is undergoing a route recomputation. If there are always feasible successors, a route never has to go into Active state and avoids a route recomputation. 

When there are no feasible successors, a route goes into Active state and a route recomputation occurs. A route recomputation commences with a router sending a query packet to all neighbors. Neighboring routers can either reply if they have feasible successors for the destination or optionally return a query indicating that they are performing a route recomputation. While in Active state, a router cannot change the next-hop neighbor it is using to forward packets. Once all replies are received for a given query, the destination can transition to Passive state and a new successor can be selected. 

When a link to a neighbor that is the only feasible successor goes down, all routes through that neighbor commence a route recomputation and enter the Active state. 


Q46. - (Topic 2) 

Which command is used to display the collection of OSPF link states? 

A. show ip ospf link-state 

B. show ip ospf lsa database 

C. show ip ospf neighbors 

D. show ip ospf database 

Answer:

Explanation: 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/iproute_ospf/command/reference/iro_osp3.html#wp1 01217 Examples The following is sample output from the show ip ospf database command when no arguments or keywords are used: Router# show ip ospf database OSPF Router with id(192.168.239.66) (Process ID 300) 


Q47. - (Topic 1) 

Which two states are the port states when RSTP has converged? (Choose two.) 

A. discarding 

B. listening 

C. learning 

D. forwarding 

E. disabled 

Answer: A,D 

Explanation: 

Understanding Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (802.1w) 

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk389/tk621/technologies_white_paper09186a0080094cf a.shtml 

Port States There are only three port states left in RSTP that correspond to the three possible operational states. The 802.1D disabled, blocking, and listening states are merged into a unique 802.1w discarding state. RSTP only has 3 port states which are discarding, learning and forwarding. When RSTP has converged there are only 2 port states left: discarding and forwarding. 


Q48. - (Topic 3) 

What are two characteristics of Frame Relay point-to-point subinterfaces? (Choose two.) 

A. They create split-horizon issues. 

B. They require a unique subnet within a routing domain. 

C. They emulate leased lines. 

D. They are ideal for full-mesh topologies. 

E. They require the use of NBMA options when using OSPF. 

Answer: B,C 

Explanation: http://www.ciscopress.com/articles/article.asp?p=170741&seqNum=5 

Configuring Frame Relay Subinterfaces On partially meshed Frame Relay networks, the problem of split horizon can be overcome by using Frame Relay subinterfaces. Frame Relay provides a mechanism to allow a physical interface to be partitioned into multiple virtual interfaces. In a similar way, using subinterfaces allows a partially meshed network to be divided into a number of smaller, fully meshed point-to-point networks. Generally, each point-to-point subnetwork is assigned a unique network address. This allows packets received on one physical interface to be sent out from the same physical interface, albeit forwarded on VCs in different subinterfaces. There are two types of subinterfaces supported by Cisco routers: point-to-point and multipoint subinterfaces.